Quality on Tap Report
GARDNERVILLE RANCHOS
GENERAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT

Also Available for Reading at www.GRGID.com


The Gardnerville Ranchos GID is pleased to present to you its' January 1 through December 31, 2015 Seventeenth Annual Quality on Tap Water Report.  This report is designed to inform you about the quality of water the District delivers to you every day.
Ground water is the only source of drinking water the District uses.  The District operates 8 wells, with wells 5, 8 and 7 held in reserve.  The wells are located on Riverview Dr, Fairway Drive, Putter Ln., West Kimmerling Rd., Dresslerville Rd., Bluerock Rd. Wyatt Lane and Rocky Terrace Way.  The District keeps the wells on W. Kimmerling Rd., Wyatt Ln. and Bluerock Rd. in ready reserve.  The District maintains over 40 miles of pipeline. 
The District started a well rehabilitation project in 2008.  Wells, 1, 2,4,6,8, had their pumps pulled to allow for inspection and cleaning of the well casing.  Well 9 is only five years old so it was not included in the program.  The casing in Well 4 on Putter Ln. was in poor shape and was making a large amount of sand due to its original construction.  The District inserted a new casing and new gravel pack.  Unfortunately, well 4 which originally produced 800 gpm in 1978 still has production issues.  Falling water within the casing causes air which can be seen at your home.  It also causes premature failure of the submersible motor and pump therefore; the District was forced to cut back production to 375 gallons per minute.  The well now works fine but the loss of 425 gallons per minute may cause the District to use backup wells for the highest demand of the summer.  The District is in the planning stages to replace Well 4 at its present location.  The District is hoping to construct a test well in the fall of 2016.  Other projects the District is planning include the replacement of older water meter pits that have plumbing issues as they are getting older.  The District has replaced the schedule 40 plastic water pipe portion of its ‘water line on Leonard Rd. between Carmel Way and S. Bluerock.  The District Board of Trustees has approved a water master plan to be completed in phases starting with fiscal year 2016-2017. An update of the District’s Wellhead Protection Plan is included in that master plan. The District completed its’ Well Head Protection Program in 1997, and updated it in 2001. The original Wellhead Protection Program utilized RSVP volunteers to help identify vulnerabilities within the District. A survey was mailed to all GRGID residents asking about hazards around the home (over 40% return was received). Lumos and Associates, Inc., the District's consulting engineering firm, identified the direction our water comes from and the area of influence for one half mile around the wells. Periodic meetings were held with groups representing Government, a GRGID Board Member and other interested parties.  Another aspect of the program is education.  The District has put together materials for school age children to help them understand about water quality and conservation and has put together a comprehensive packet for adults with similar materials. The Wellhead Protection Program was funded through volunteer work, District user fees and a grant through the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection.  Subsequent to the completion of the Wellhead Protection Report, the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection established criteria for State endorsement of Wellhead Protection Programs. On July 28, 2000 the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection certified the District’s wellhead Protection Program.

If you have any questions about the District’s Wellhead Protection Program or concerning your water utility, please contact Bob Spellberg, District Manager at 265-2048, or drop by the District Office at 931 Mitch Dr. The District wants its residents to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of the District's regularly scheduled Board Meetings. They are held on the first Wednesday of the month at 6:00 p.m. at District Office, 931 Mitch Dr.
 The Gardnerville Ranchos General Improvement District routinely monitors for constituents in your drinking water in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Tests for lead, copper, nitrates, nitrites, asbestos, arsenic and monthly coliform bacteria tests meet all state and federal guidelines. Well 5 and Well 8 were being tested twice monthly using a blending method to show their individual averages meet the current arsenic standard of 10 parts per billion.  The blending method allows other well water that tests below 10 ppb to mix with well 5 or 8 water prior to the first user. All testing for both wells is below the 10 ppb requirement.  Tests for SOC and VOC have come back as undetected in GRGID's water system.  The District is also testing for chlorine disinfectant byproducts.  These tests also meet all State and Federal Standards.  Please understand that drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some constituents. 
The EPA has lowered the standard for the allowable amount of arsenic in the United States water supplies.  The old standard was 50 parts per billion.  The new standard is 10 parts per billion.  The rule went into effect in January 2006. With the exception of the District’s Well 5 and Well 8 all other District wells are under the 10 parts per billion.  The District applied for and was granted a three-year extension to deal with the arsenic issue within Wells 5 and 8.  The District started a State approved project of testing arsenic levels twice monthly for the two wells.  To date both wells averages are below 10 ppb. The extension expired in January of 2009.  Since the District test program for water blending to lower the arsenic levels from wells five and eight were successful, the State agreed that the District had complied with the arsenic rule and requires quarterly testing of the two wells that continue to come in under the 10 ppb threshold.  The District replaced water line on Bowles Ln. in 2010.  Bowles Ln. had a history of water main breakage due to poor installation in the late 1970s.  The District used latest technology to ensure a long life for this water line. The District replaced schedule 40 plastic pipe between Sweetwater Dr. and Manhattan Way on Kingston in 2014.  Each year for the past four years, the District has replaced older technology meter pits within Unit 6.  The District has a backflow prevention program to ensure the protection of the District’s water supply. 
The following are definitions of terms used for identifying testing criteria:
Action Level - the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
 Maximum Contaminant Level - The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
 Maximum Contaminant Level Goal - The “Goal”(MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Action Level: the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.
 Treatment Technique(TT): a treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): the highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.  There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
 Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG): the level of drinking water disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
Non-Detects: laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.
 Parts per Million (ppm):  or milligrams per liter (mg/l)
 Parts per Billion (ppb): or micrograms per liter (ug/l)
 Pico curies per Liter (pCi/L): Pico curie per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.
 Millirems per Year (mrem/yr): measure of radiation absorbed by the body
Million Fibers per Liter (MFL): million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers that are longer than 10 micrometers.
 Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU): nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of water.  Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person
The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water) included rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.
 Containments that may be present in source water before we treat it include:
 Microbial contaminants: such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.
 Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
 Pesticides and herbicides, may come from a variety of sources such as storm water run-off, agriculture, and residential users.
 Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or the result of mining activity.
 Organic contaminates, including synthetics and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
 In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulation which limits the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  We treat our water according to EPA’s regulations, Food and Drug administration regulations establish limits for contaminates in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.
 Our water system is required to test a minimum of 10 samples each month for Coliform microbiological contaminants.  Coliform bacteria are usually harmless, but their presences in water can be an indication of disease-causing bacteria.  When coliform bacteria are found, special follow-up tests are done to determine if harmful bacteria are present in the water supply.  If this limit is exceeded, the water supplier must notify the public by newspaper, television or radio.  The District has also been required to create a sampling program which was submitted to the Bureau of Safe Drinking water and approved.  This testing program shows where monthly tests are to be taken and if there was an issue with a sample where follow up samples will be taken.

Testing Results for GARDNERVILLE RANCHOS GID

 

Microbiological

Result

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source

No Detected Results were Found in the Calendar Year of 2015

 

Lead and Copper

Date

90TH Percentile

Unit

AL

Sites
Over AL

Typical Source

COPPER

2011 - 2013

0.17

ppm

1.3

0

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives.

LEAD

2011 - 2013

2

ppb

15

0

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits.

 

Regulated Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Value

Range

Unit

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source

ARSENIC

7/02/2015

11

4-11

ppb

10

0

Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards; Runoff from glass and electronics production wastes.

BARIUM

02/11/2014

.08

.04-0.08

ppm

2

2

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits.

CHROMIUM

01/22/2014

2

1-2

ppb

100

100

Discharge from steel and pulp mills; Erosion of natural deposits.

FLUORIDE

02/11/2014

1.7

.2-1.7

ppm

2

4

Natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth.

NICKEL

02/11/2014

.002

0.001-0.002

MG/L

.1

     .1            Erosion of natural deposits;

NITRATE

 

 

DI(2-ETHYLHEXYL)
PHTHALATE

01/14/2015

 

 

 

01/22/2014

0.5-4.1

 

 

 

2.4

0.5 - 2.4

 

 

 

0.7-2.4

ppm

 

 

 

ppb

10

 

 

 

6

10

 

 

 

   0

Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

 

Discharge from rubber and
Chemical factories

 

Radionuclides

Collection Date

Highest Value

Range

Unit

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source

 Combined Uranium

10/02/2015

2

2

ug/L

30

0

Erosion of natural deposits

GROSS BETA
RADON & U

 

10/06/2015

 

5.5

 

4.9-5.5

 

pCi/L

 

50

 

0

Decay of natural and manmade deposits

GROSS ALPHA, INCL. RADON & U

10/06/2015

2.1

.03-2.1

pCi/L

15

0

Decay of natural and man-made deposits

 

Secondary Contaminants

Collection Date

Highest Value

Range

Unit

SMCL

MCLG

ALKALINITY, BICARBONATE

11/14/2013

143

143

mg/L

ALKALINITY, TOTAL

11/14/2013

119

119

mg/L

BORON, TOTAL

11/14/2013

0.2

0.2

mg/L

CALCIUM

11/14/2013

22

22

mg/L

CHLORIDE

02/11/2014

10

5-10

mg/L

400

COLOR

01/23/2014

<5

<5

CU

15

CONDUCTIVITY @ 25 C UMHOS/CM

11/14/2013

10

10

UMHO/CM

HARDNESS, CALCIUM

Iron

11/14/2013

02/11/2014

80

0.07

80

0.07

mg/L

mg/L            0.6

MAGNESIUM

02/19/2014

10

<5-10

mg/L

150

pH

02/12/2014

8.62

7.91-8.62

pH

8.5

SILICA

11/14/2013

32

32

mg/L

SODIUM

02/11/2014

58

12-58

mg/L

200

20

SULFATE

02/11/2014

55

13-55

mg/L

500

TDS

02/11/2014

234

142-234

mg/L

1000

Health Information About Water Quality

Additional Required Health Effects Language:

Some people who drink water containing arsenic in excess of the MCL over many years could experience skin damage or problems with their circulatory system, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

The State of Nevada has set forth a more stringent MCL of 2.0 mg/L for Fluoride than the federal limit of 4.0 mg/L assigned nationally. Some people who drink water containing fluoride in excess of the MCL over many years could get bone disease, including pain and tenderness of the bones. Fluoride in drinking water at half the MCL or more may cause mottling of the teeth of children, usually in children less than nine years old.  Mottling, also known as dental fluorosis, may include brown staining and/or pitting of the teeth, and occurs only in developing teeth before they erupt from the gums.

 

DD01086_

Violations

The Gardnerville Ranchos GID had no violations during the 2015 Calendar Year.

 

 

Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule-Cycle 3

                                                                                                                                                               Minimum
Analyte                Result                              Units                                   Recording Level Average         


Chlorate

100

ug/L

20

80

Chromium

1.1

ug/L

.2

.59

Hexavalent Chromium

1.3

ug/L

.03

.68

Strontium

460

ug/L

.3

311

Vanadium

11

ug/L

.2

11.5

Molybdenum

30

ug/L

1

30

HEALTH INFORMATION ABOUT WATER QUALITY

While your drinking water meets EPA’s standard for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic.  EPA’s standard balances the current understanding of arsenic’s possible health effects against the cost of removing arsenic from drinking water. EPA continues to research the health effects of low levels of arsenic which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems.

*Arsenic levels in wells 1, 2, 4, 6 and 9 are all less than 10 parts per billion.  Wells 5 and 8 are being tested quarterly using the blending method which has been approved by the State Bureau of Safe Drinking Water.  Both wells 5 and 8 have consistently tested below the 10 parts per billion rule when blended.
The District tested for lead and copper at 30 homes as required by the Bureau of Safe Drinking Water.  The District must test the same homes if possible each time the tests are required.  This testing tells the public if lead and copper in amounts over the limit set by the State are present.  Last year one home tested over the limit.  The District will retest the home and if the numbers are still high, the District will suggest to the homeowner methods of lowering the copper content within the home.
Your water meets EPA's standard for Lead, but if present at elevated levels, this contaminant can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Gardnerville Ranchos GID Water System is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your drinking water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.
Please understand that the presence of contaminants in your drinking water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can
be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

The Gardnerville Ranchos General Improvement District is proud to be able to provide your family with clean, quality water. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply, improvements that will benefit all of our customers have been made. The District secured two loans from the State of Nevada
Revolving Loan Fund for a total of $4.4 million dollars to replace steel water main and upgrading of District fire hydrants in those areas where water main has been replaced.  This project has been completed and has allowed for the movement of Well 1 water supply to the high pressure side. 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about
drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). 

We at the Gardnerville Ranchos General Improvement District work around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap.  The District asks that all our residents help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future.

Bob Spellberg
District Manager